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wiggle wiggle

wiggle wiggle

(Source: thechantellebrett, via nicool)

thekaylameowmew:

The Merle Spurrier Gymnasium Swimming Pool At The University of Rochester
Abandoned in 1982 and now used for storage of school furniture

i hope this exists.

thekaylameowmew:

The Merle Spurrier Gymnasium Swimming Pool At The University of Rochester

Abandoned in 1982 and now used for storage of school furniture

i hope this exists.

(via howcouldiknow)

Truth in numbers?

new-aesthetic:

Xerox scanners/photocopiers randomly alter numbers in scanned documents

The error does not occur if PDFs are scanned with OCR, or TIFs are scanned (the latter seems plausible, as the pure image data should be saved into the TIF). Additionally, there seems to be a correlation between font size, scan dpi used. I was able to reliably reproduce the error for 200 DPI PDF scans w/o OCR, of sheets with Arial 7pt and 8pt numbers. Overall it looks like some sort of compression algorithm using patches more than once (I think I could even identify some equally-pixeled eights).
Edit: It seems that the above thought was not that wrong at all. Several mails I got suggest that the xerox machines use JBIG2 for compression. This algorithm creates a dictionary of image patches it finds “similar”. Those patches then get reused instead of the original image data, as long as the error generated by them is not “too high”. Makes sense.

This also would explain, why the error occurs when scanning letters or numbers in low resolution (still readable, though). In this case, the letter size is close to the patch size of JBIG2, and whole “similar” letters or even letter blocks get replaced by each other.

Truth in numbers?

new-aesthetic:

Xerox scanners/photocopiers randomly alter numbers in scanned documents

The error does not occur if PDFs are scanned with OCR, or TIFs are scanned (the latter seems plausible, as the pure image data should be saved into the TIF). Additionally, there seems to be a correlation between font size, scan dpi used. I was able to reliably reproduce the error for 200 DPI PDF scans w/o OCR, of sheets with Arial 7pt and 8pt numbers. Overall it looks like some sort of compression algorithm using patches more than once (I think I could even identify some equally-pixeled eights).

Edit: It seems that the above thought was not that wrong at all. Several mails I got suggest that the xerox machines use JBIG2 for compression. This algorithm creates a dictionary of image patches it finds “similar”. Those patches then get reused instead of the original image data, as long as the error generated by them is not “too high”. Makes sense.

This also would explain, why the error occurs when scanning letters or numbers in low resolution (still readable, though). In this case, the letter size is close to the patch size of JBIG2, and whole “similar” letters or even letter blocks get replaced by each other.

wnycradiolab:

likeafieldmouse:

Dennis Oppenheim - Two-stage Transfer Drawing (1971)

"As I run a marker along Eric’s back he attempts to duplicate the movement on the wall. My activity stimulates a kinetic response from his sensory system. I am, therefore, drawing through him"

Fascinating.

kateoplis: Missed Connection - M4W

kateoplis:

For months we sat on the train saying nothing to each other. We survived on bags of skittles sold to us by kids raising money for their basketball teams. We must have heard a million mariachi bands, had our faces nearly kicked in by a hundred thousand break dancers. I gave money to the beggars…

(Source: newyork.craigslist.org)

AUSTIN KLEON: No internet in bed or at the kitchen table.

austinkleon:

From The Frailest Thing, comes a great list, “11 Things I’m Trying To Do In Order To Achieve a Sane, Healthy, and Marginally Productive Relationship With the Internet.” My favorites:

1. Don’t wake up with the Internet. Have breakfast, walk the dog, read a book, whatever … do something…

kateoplis:

Stripped

explore-blog:

David Ogilvy’s timeless principles of creative management

explore-blog:

David Ogilvy’s timeless principles of creative management

(Source: , via explore-blog)

ocelott:

the-rosy-crucifixion:

Enrique Metinides, Mexico City, April 29, 1979 
Metinides photographed crime scenes in Mexico for over 50 years. This photograph, in particular, speaks a thousand words. This woman was a famous journalist on her way to a release party for one of her books. Two cars crashed, ran over her, and killed her. Nonetheless, her make up remains intact and her eyes seem to be staring sadly, but almost dreamingly at the skies. Absolutely stunning.

THIS IS GORGEOUS. Please enlarge.

ocelott:

the-rosy-crucifixion:

Enrique Metinides, Mexico City, April 29, 1979 

Metinides photographed crime scenes in Mexico for over 50 years. This photograph, in particular, speaks a thousand words. This woman was a famous journalist on her way to a release party for one of her books. Two cars crashed, ran over her, and killed her. Nonetheless, her make up remains intact and her eyes seem to be staring sadly, but almost dreamingly at the skies. Absolutely stunning.

THIS IS GORGEOUS. Please enlarge.

(via procaine)

sunbathing

sunbathing

(Source: excisions, via procaine)

wnycradiolab:

Eckhard Völcker’s extraoridnary, stained-glass-like images of conifers.  Explore more of his work at his website, Wunderkanone:

We are surrounded by another world that this hidden to the naked eye.  The microscope reveals its beauty…two hundred years ago, the news that a drop of pond water contained an abundance of small creatures was a big sensation. Soon afterwards, some tinkerers traveled around with home-made instruments, revealing this ‘wonder’ to a large audience.  In the vernacular, this instrument was called the ‘Wunderkanone’ - a ‘Wonder Cannon.’

Swoon.

kateoplis:

gpoylife

kateoplis:

gpoylife

designerdaily:

New Post has been published on http://www.designer-daily.com/collages-by-a-ruiz-villar-36892

Collages by A. Ruiz Villar

designerdaily:

New Post has been published on http://www.designer-daily.com/collages-by-a-ruiz-villar-36892

Collages by A. Ruiz Villar

image

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“When we have learned how to listen to trees, then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy.”

— For Hermann Hesse’s birthday, his sublime mediation on what trees teach us about belonging and life. (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

“What do we do now, now that we are happy?”

— Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot (via austinkleon)

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